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  1. #1
    just some guy schenkm's Avatar
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    Post How To: Servicing Rear Drum Brakes

    How To: Service Rear Drum Brakes
    Changing Drums, Shoes, Hardware and Wheel Cylinder

    ***DISCLAIMER***
    Proceed at your own risk. I am not a licensed mechanic nor do I have any formal training in automotive repair. These instructions are simply a step-by-step reproduction of how I serviced the rear brakes on my Ford Ranger. There may be better ways and methods for completing the repair and maintenance covered by these instructions, but the following has worked well for me.

    This was my first time doing the work described in these instructions. I decided to write these instructions to aid anybody else who is considering servicing drum brakes themselves.

    ***NOTE***

    The truck I worked on was a 1996 Ford Ranger with the 10 drum brakes with ABS. Other years may be different. Parts for your truck may differ slightly, especially if you have the 9 drums. Consult your auto parts supplier for proper parts.

    *PARTS AND MATERIALS*
    1 Set of Brake Shoes ($21.99)
    1 Drum Brake Hardware Kit ($6.69)
    Brake Grease (~$2)
    Brake Spring Compressor Tool ($7.99) OPTIONAL

    Brake Spring Plier Tool ($7.99) OPTIONAL

    2 Sets of Brake Adjuster Hardware Kits - Left and Right (~$10 each) OPTIONAL
    Wheel Cylinder ($12.49 each) IF NEEDED
    Brake Drum ($38.99 each) IF NEEDED
    Brake Cleaner ($3.29)

    Prices may differ.

    *TOOLS REQUIRED*
    Jack
    Jack Stands
    Appropriate Wrenches to remove wheels
    Needle Nose Pliers
    Brake Spring Compressor Tool (optional but HIGHLY recommended)
    Brake Spring Plier Tool (optional but HIGHLY recommended)
    Vise Grips
    2 Flat Head Screw Drivers
    Catch pan
    7/16 Brake Line Wrench (if replacing Wheel Cylinder)
    1/2 Wrench/Socket (if replacing Wheel Cylinder)

    *******


    1. Release the parking brake, loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels, chock the front wheels, jack the rear axle up and place it on jack stands. Remove the rear wheels.

    2. Remove the drums. If they do not slide off you will have to retract the shoes. On the back side of the brake backing plate you will see a rectangular rubber plug near the bottom. Remove the plug and shine a light through the hole. You will see a wheel with teeth. Insert a flat head screw driver and rotate that wheel UP to retract the shoes.



    This photo shows, from the inside, what you will be doing to retract the shoes. Circled in red is the rubber plug that needs to be removed. The green arrow shows the adjusting wheel. If the adjusting wheel does not turn, you may need to insert a second screw driver and depress the adjuster (the pivoting metal piece partially circled in red).

    3. With the drums removed, you should see this:



    Hopefully you will not see this:



    Put both drums aside. You will need to work on one side at a time and use the other side as reference.

    4. Place the catch pan under the brake assembly and liberally spray the brakes with brake cleaner. Let air dry.

    5. Remove the Shoe Retracting Springs (A), the Adjusting Cable eye (B) and the Anchor Pin Plate (C). If you bought the hardware kit, the springs can be disposed but keep the adjusting cable and anchor plate.


    Remove the Parking Brake Strut (the metal bar just below the Wheel Cylinder with a spring on one end).

    6. Now the Shoe Retaining Springs and Pins need to be removed. There is one per shoe. These can be discarded if you purchased the hardware kit.



    7. Remove the Adjusting Screw (A), the Adjusting Cable (if it was not completely removed in step 5) (B), the Lower Spring (C), and the Adjusting Pawl and Spring (D). The Lower Spring can be discarded if you purchased the hardware kit.


    The Primary Shoe should be completely free - remove it. The Secondary Shoe will still be attached to the Parking Brake Cable via the Actuating Lever. Separate them.


    8. Everything except the Wheel Cylinder should now be removed from the brake backing plate. Now is a good time to spray down the brake with brake cleaner one more time. Let it air dry, then clean it thoroughly with a rag. Spray it again if necessary.
    This is also a good time to take all the hardware and parts that will be reused and clean them thoroughly. I would suggest putting all the parts to be discarded off to the side but do not discard them yet - just in case you need to reuse something.

    This is a good time to replace the Wheel Cylinder if you need to. If not, skip ahead to step 9.
    WC1. If your brake looks like this:

    You DEFINITELY need to replace the Wheel Cylinder (referred to as WC from here on out). If you are not sure if the WC needs to be replaced, carefully pull back on the rubber seals. If brake fluid escapes, you should replace or overhaul the WC.

    WC2. The WC is held on by two bolts and the brake line that go through the brake backing plate. Use a 7/16 brake wrench to loosen the brake line. Use a 1/2 wrench or ratchet to loosen the two bolts. If they are on too tight, spray the area with penetrating oil like PB Blaster. Now would be a good time to start cleaning the parts while the oil soaks in.

    WC3. Remove the brake line fitting - it does not need to be pulled back from the WC. Remove the two bolts.

    WC4. Pull the old WC out and clean the mating surface before installing the new WC. Place the new WC in the slot, install the two bolts, and then install the brake line. These need to be tightened down pretty good. Now is also a good time to loosen the bleed valve to make bleeding the brake easier.

    It should now look like this:


    9. At your work bench, remove the retaining clip (C) that holds the Secondary Brake Shoe (A) and the Parking Brake Actuating Lever (B) together. I found it very difficult to remove without destroying it. You should have a new one in your hardware kit, but my kit came with only one new retaining clip but an extra shoe retaining clip.

    The old Brake Shoe can be discarded but we will be reusing the Actuating Lever.

    10. Install the Actuating Lever and retaining clip on the new brake shoe. Then install the Parking Brake Cable to the Actuating Lever making sure it is installed the correct way (use the other brake as reference). Let the brake shoe and lever hang down for now.

    11. Apply Brake Grease to the shoe backing plates. Make sure you get all of them.


    Lubricate the threads of the threads of the Adjusting Screw with brake grease.


    12. Refer to this Photo for the installation steps:

    Position the shoes, one at a time, on the backing plate. Insert the Shoe Retaining Pin from the back of the backing plate all the way through the shoe. Place a Retaining Spring over the pin, then use the Brake Spring Compressor Tool to install the Retaining Spring Cap (see the photo from step 6). This step can be very difficult by yourself because the brake shoe may not want to stay put while you try to install the retaining clip. Although not strictly necessary, I had a MUCH easier time performing this step with the brake spring tool. (PHOTO - A)

    13. Install the parking brake strut with one end in the slot in the primary shoe and the other end in the Actuating Lever - not the Secondary Shoe. Use the other brake for reference.
    Make sure the Wheel Cylinder pushrods are in the proper slots in the brake shoes. (PHOTO - B)

    14. Install the Adjusting Screw into the bottom of the Shoes in its appropriate slots. The long end of the screw should be facing the front of the vehicle (PHOTO - C). Install the Adjusting Pawl and spring (PHOTO - D) and then the lower Spring (PHOTO - E).

    15. Now for the top of the brake. Install the Anchor Pin Plate (PHOTO - G) and the Cable Guide (PHOTO - F). The cable guide should fit flush against the shoe. One of mine did but the other one took a little filing to get it to seat properly.
    Install the eye of the Adjusting Cable (PHOTO - H).

    16. Install the Shoe Retracting Springs (PHOTOS - I & J). This is where the Spring Pliers really come in handy. Slip the hooked jaw of the plier over the spring hook and place the end of the other jaw in a hole on the top of the opposite brake shoe. Then squeeze the plier handles together and the spring should easily slip over the stud. This method is so much easier than trying to strong arm the springs into place using vice grips.

    17. Finally, route the Adjusting Cable around the cable guide and connect the hook at the end to the Adjusting Pawl. The hook should attach from behind the Pawl, not over top of it. You can lift the pawl up to make installation easy.

    18. Make sure everything is seated correctly including the Wheel Cylinder pushrods, Parking Brake Strut, and Adjusting Screw.

    19. If you have new drums, install them. If you are reusing your old drums, either have them resurfaced or at least scrub any hard spots with fine emory cloth.

    20. From behind the brake, use your screw driver to push DOWN on the adjusting screw until the shoes come into contact with the drum, then back the screw off. If you installed a new Wheel Cylinder, now is a good time to bleed the brake. Remember to top off the brake fluid. The brakes should self adjust when you apply the brakes while going in reverse.

    21. Now repeat for the other side!
    1996 Ranger XLT Supercab
    4.0L V6, Auto, 2wd 6" Skyjacker lift, 32x11.5x15 Maxxis Bighorns, Powertrax no-slip, 1-piece Aluminum Drive Shaft, Westin Classic Brush Guard. 200,000 miles and still running great!
    http://duaemanus.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    just some guy schenkm's Avatar
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    Some additional thoughts:
    This was the first time I've even looked at a drum brake with the drum removed. With the proper tools and some time, they really are not that difficult.

    I wish I could have taken more photos but I was rushed to finish before it got dark (failed at that though).

    I really hope this can help somebody, especially somebody like me who put this off far to long because I was unsure of how difficult it would be.
    1996 Ranger XLT Supercab
    4.0L V6, Auto, 2wd 6" Skyjacker lift, 32x11.5x15 Maxxis Bighorns, Powertrax no-slip, 1-piece Aluminum Drive Shaft, Westin Classic Brush Guard. 200,000 miles and still running great!
    http://duaemanus.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    snow is cold captainmo's Avatar
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    Wow, really nice walk through. Thanks! I hope to use it someday when the snow drys up.

  4. #4
    Salt Water Fury ZAZZ's Avatar
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    Salt water/air exposure really complicates this procedure I had to have the drums busted off in Dec 2007.
    -ZZ: My Space Page!
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    2001 Ford Ranger EDGE 3.0L 2WD - K&N Air Filter; Essentially Stock
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  5. #5
    2010 Ranger XL Silas's Avatar
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    good writeup for the noobs schenkm!

    good job !
    Long time owner of Rangers...F-150s...Crown Vics... FORDS ...

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  6. #6
    Manifold HeatFlap Springs ccernst's Avatar
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    that's pretty good write up. I *really* like the pictures with the parts outlined. some pictures guys take, it looks like a bunch of rusty parts that you can't tell what's what if you haven't seen it before.

    I haven't tried working on a drum in over 10 years...I'll be looking this one up when I take the ranger's apart.
    Mine: '98 Ranger 4x4 SuperCab 3.0L Manual - 173k miles
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  7. #7
    Brewster
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    Good write up! My personal recommendation is that any time you service the rear brakes, you go with new wheel cylinders. They are just too cheap to pass up, especially considering how long the interval is between needing new shoes.

    I would also second the strong recommendation for the brake spring tool and the brake pliers. I've done it plenty of times without the tools, but it's a PITA.
    1999 Ranger XLT SuperCab - 3.0L FFV, Auto, RWD - UDPs, HWBP & 180 T-stat, Bilsteins, Xcal2, DynoMax cat-back, "tweaked" intake
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  8. #8
    just some guy schenkm's Avatar
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    Quote Posted by SixFoFalcon View Post
    Good write up! My personal recommendation is that any time you service the rear brakes, you go with new wheel cylinders. They are just too cheap to pass up, especially considering how long the interval is between needing new shoes.
    That's not bad advice and I think I'd second it.

    Thanks for all the kind words - just trying to give back to the community that has helped me out a lot, I just wish I had more time to take better pictures.
    1996 Ranger XLT Supercab
    4.0L V6, Auto, 2wd 6" Skyjacker lift, 32x11.5x15 Maxxis Bighorns, Powertrax no-slip, 1-piece Aluminum Drive Shaft, Westin Classic Brush Guard. 200,000 miles and still running great!
    http://duaemanus.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    03' FX4/Level II Karren's Avatar
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    Awesome tutorial!! Very professional and easy to follow too! Can you do one for a front wheel hub unit? By tommorow? Lol.
    2003 Black Ranger FX4/Level II - 4.0 Litre V6 - Automatic - 61k miles


  10. #10
    just some guy schenkm's Avatar
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    Quote Posted by Karren View Post
    Awesome tutorial!! Very professional and easy to follow too! Can you do one for a front wheel hub unit? By tommorow? Lol.
    Actually, I do plan on replacing my front pads, rotors, and wheel bearings within a week. I just need a full day without rain. I'm planning on taking pictures of that whole ordeal as well.
    1996 Ranger XLT Supercab
    4.0L V6, Auto, 2wd 6" Skyjacker lift, 32x11.5x15 Maxxis Bighorns, Powertrax no-slip, 1-piece Aluminum Drive Shaft, Westin Classic Brush Guard. 200,000 miles and still running great!
    http://duaemanus.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    Summer cruising/mod time Andrew_2006's Avatar
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    not bad write up man! brought mback some fun times when i did mine lol.
    Had everything apart in our shop which was 25 mins from a parts store got the wheels off and everything opened up and springs were snapped, the cable snapped and was bitch of time.

    Definetly worth the 20$ while you got everything apart looking good or not replace the springs since there doing all the work.

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  12. #12
    Torque Converter Builder dirtyd0g's Avatar
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    Wheel cylinders are not the only thing to cause the brakes to be wet. If the rear axle seals leak it will do the same thing. To replace those you have to remove the differential cover, remove the 8mm bolt and pull the cross pin out. Then slide the axles in and remove the clips. I highly suggest a good 6 point 5/16 or 8mm wrench. for the small bolt. They round easily. After all that pull the axles and inspect them for excessive wear or a groove. Sand them lightly with some 360-400 grit sandpaper, replace seals and reassemble everything. Don't forget to fill the gear oil back up.
    Alan
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    Just your run of the mill high mileage work truck.

  13. #13
    808crusah
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    u r the MAN!
    98 2.5L 3/5 soon to be 5/7....

  14. #14
    Administrator Adam Baker's Avatar
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    Just thought I'd add this this is the procedure for 10" drums. AFAIK 9" drums are set up differently. Its been so long since Ive looked at 9" drums that I cant remember, but Im pretty sure they are set up differently.

  15. #15
    Think BIG, Be BIG!!
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    I replaced my rear brake shoes (10") this evening and I did everything in agreement with what the OP and the Haynes manual said on the reinstall. Unfortunately, I'm having a hell of a time fitting the drums over the new shoes . I've retractacted the actuator as much as I could and its still won't slide over. I am trying to reuse the original drums, so maybe I need to resurface them first. I sanded the inside with fine grit sand paper thinking that would of made a difference but it didn't. I'm gonna try and resurface them tomorrow on a rotor lathe. I'm not to confident that's gonna make a difference since their diameter is about 10" now, I think the max allowable was a hair over that...IDK...you guys got any other suggestions?
    My other vehicle's got an inline 6...

  16. #16
    Snorky MRSNUGGLES's Avatar
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    Quote Posted by AxisPower View Post
    I replaced my rear brake shoes (10") this evening and I did everything in agreement with what the OP and the Haynes manual said on the reinstall. Unfortunately, I'm having a hell of a time fitting the drums over the new shoes . I've retractacted the actuator as much as I could and its still won't slide over. I am trying to reuse the original drums, so maybe I need to resurface them first. I sanded the inside with fine grit sand paper thinking that would of made a difference but it didn't. I'm gonna try and resurface them tomorrow on a rotor lathe. I'm not to confident that's gonna make a difference since their diameter is about 10" now, I think the max allowable was a hair over that...IDK...you guys got any other suggestions?
    sometimes sanding will do it, other times its the way the pads are seated together, sometimes they may not be in position right at the top where it cups around the stud. it may need a little smack into position with your palm. Any time i've ever had my brakes apart that would be the problem when putting them back together. I hope its just the sanding for you taht's the issue.


    as for this write up: sticky that sh*t
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  17. #17
    Think BIG, Be BIG!!
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    Quote Posted by MRSNUGGLES View Post
    sometimes sanding will do it, other times its the way the pads are seated together, sometimes they may not be in position right at the top where it cups around the stud. it may need a little smack into position with your palm. Any time i've ever had my brakes apart that would be the problem when putting them back together. I hope its just the sanding for you taht's the issue.


    as for this write up: sticky that sh*t
    Yeah I'll definitely lathe'm up when I get a chance. I was also reading some stuff on the parking break adjuster and started to suspect that as being a possible reason...not sure I'll check it out tonight. So what's the most spacing one can expect between the circumferance of the new shoes and the inside diameter of the drum? Just trying to get an idea on what I should be expecting.
    My other vehicle's got an inline 6...

  18. #18
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    Excellent! Particular praise for including the tools that make the job easier. I recently did my front rotors/pads/bearings and stumbled more than once on which tool was needed to make the job easier.

    I will attempt the rear brakes soon with this DIY, thank you for sharing.

  19. #19
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    Quick question - What is the difference between the Drum Brake Hardware kit (1x) and the Brake Spring Adjuster kit (2x)? I am looking at pictures on Rockauto and they both look like they have the same components??

  20. #20
    Ranging
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    Great post. This should make my life easier. Great recommendations on the tools.

  21. #21
    S-10 Driver Washout's Avatar
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    Very useful thread. found this on a search.

    Question: I completed my driver side rear drum and moved to my passenger.
    When I removed the hub a bunch of broken springs fell out.

    Thankfully I followed the advice above and had purchased the spring kit.

    I found out where that bad noise was coming from and also found that I need a new adjuster thing as mine got ground down.

    I ran into another glitch when assembling the brakes. The cable thing with the spring that goes to the adjuster arm thing is on the wrong side. The guide will only fit in the hole on the right shoe assembly however the arm is attached to the left.

    What gives?

    Seeing how I need a new adjusting mechanism anyway, I assembled without the adjuster arm thing, cable, and spring. I will need to get this fixed soon though as there is no way to automatically adjust the shoes nor will any adjustments stay put. Fine with new shoes ans they fit tight anyway, but once there is wear on them...problems.

    So what's up with the cable guide only being able to attach to the wrong side?

  22. #22
    S-10 Driver Washout's Avatar
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    great thread!

    i just did my rear drums and used this info to get 'er done.

    Question is though, why is it my passenger side shoes are wrong? The cable thing and guide is on the wrong side. The guide should go into the left shoe and come down the left side to hook up with the adjusting arm thing, but the hole for the guide is too big and it falls out. Seems the manufacturer put the right hole for th eguide on the wrong side.

    Any ideas or suggestions?

  23. #23
    Not an S-10 Driver Hybrid172's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    First, I used this to redo my emergency brakes since I had to take it all apart to do them. Found out I need two new seals (for another day). Walk through was GREAT!! and even though mine was a tad different, it was still spot on.

    Second, should have taken a pic, but I just wanted to get it done. I don't know if you want to add this, but I got those Shoe Retaining Springs and Pins out very easily grabbing the Spring with a set of regular pliers and pushing in while I held the Pin with needle nose pliers, then twisted one to release. It was a bit more tedious putting them back on, but it still worked great.

  24. #24
    Supra Driver
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    Excellent walk through. If I could add a couple pieces of advice. I found it much easier to leave the parking brake actuator connected to the cable. Just need to remove the clip before you take the shoe off. Saved a lot of effort putting it back on the spring/cable. Also, I lubed between the parking brake lever and the shoe to try and prevent rust/seizing in this area.

  25. #25
    aka 'NHBubba' cosamuel's Avatar
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    Well done.

    Only thing I can think to add is to stress that the self adjust on reverse is for *fine* adjusting. Do not forget to dial in the adjustment screw with a spoon or driver before putting the inspection plug back onto the back of the drum plate. I've been leaving mine so they just barely drag a tincy bit. Should you forget, you will have 3 wheel brakes and a pull to one side when braking. Ask me how I know... Don't be like me boys and girls.
    2003 Ford Ranger FX4 LevelII

  26. #26
    S-10 Driver
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    thanks for posting the pics i bought a 7.5 with 10 inch drums but some one had already taken the drums and shoes off and these are best pictures i have found

  27. #27
    S-10 Driver
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    Thanks for this post!

    One thing I'm in doubt though is that the wheel cylinder I bought did not come with the pitch fork ends that were in the rubber mounts on the cylinder sides. I stuck the old ones in there but I'm not sure if it was done correctly.

    Any tips on how that is done properly??

    Mahalo and Aloha

 

 

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